MarsNews.com
December 3rd, 2014

NASA to test Orion spaceship that could take humans to Mars Bloomberg

The U.S. is preparing to launch the first craft developed to fly humans to Mars, presaging a second space age — this one fueled by billionaires like Elon Musk rather than a Cold War contest with the Soviet Union.
An unmanned version of the Orion spaceship built by Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMT) is scheduled for liftoff tomorrow to an altitude of 3,600 miles (5,800 kilometers), the farthest from Earth by a vehicle designed for people since the Apollo program was scrapped in 1972. “These are really exciting times for space exploration and for our nation as we begin to return to the ability to fly humans to space,” said Jim Crocker, vice president and general manager of civil space at Lockheed Martin Space Systems. “What Orion is about is going further into space than humans have ever gone before.”

May 1st, 2013

Amgen Drugs May Boost Survival During a Nuclear Attack and Trips to Mars Bloomberg

Amgen Inc. (AMGN)’s Neulasta and Neupogen and a similar blood-boosting drug from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (TEVA) may help people survive after a nuclear attack, U.S. regulators said.
Medications known as leukocyte growth factors, which also include Sanofi (SAN)’s Leukine, may help decrease death rates from radiation exposure, Food and Drug Administration staff said today in a report. FDA staff reviewed a National Institutes of Health study on monkeys exposed to radiation that were given Neupogen. Agency advisers plan to meet May 3 to discuss whether the animal study is sufficient to approve the use for humans.

July 20th, 2004

Bush’s Manned Mars Mission Funds Cut By $538 Mln in House Bill Bloomberg

Funds for President George W. Bush’s plan to use the moon as a base for possible manned missions to Mars were cut by more than half next year in a bill approved by a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration would get $15.1 billion under the bill, which cuts $538 million from Bush’s plan to spend $910 million on the Mars proposal in the 2005 fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2004.