Martian Volcanoes May Not be Extinct

Mars appears to be a calm and desolate planet, but scientists now think something big is brewing beneath its wind-swept surface.
New research on Hawaiian volcanoes, combined with satellite imagery of Mars, suggests that three Martian volcanoes may only be dormant—not extinct. Instead of Mars’ crust moving over stationary magma “hot spots,” as occurs on Earth, researchers think the plumes travel.
“On Earth, the Hawaiian islands were built from volcanoes that erupted as the Earth’s crust slid over a hot spot—a plume of rising magma,” said Jacob Bleacher, a planetary scientist at Arizona State University and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. “Our research raises the possibility that the opposite happens on Mars; a plume might move beneath stationary crust.”