Planetary Scientists Solve 40-Year-Old Mysteries of Mars’ Northern Ice Cap UANews

A team of planetary scientists has used radar and a high-resolution camera to reveal the subsurface geology of Mars’ northern ice cap.
The findings – based on data from SHARAD (the surface-penatrating radar) and HiRISE (the high-resolution camera) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter – were published May 27 in two papers in the journal Nature.
The group studying a canyon feature called Chasma Boreale included Shane Byrne from University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Jack Holt and Isaac Smith of The University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics are the papers’ lead authors.
“The ice sheet on Mars’ northern polar region is about the size and thickness of the Greenland ice sheet,” said Byrne. “Just like Greenland, the layers of ice on Mars preserve a climate record that reaches back probably a few million years. Studying this ice sheet and its internal layers tells us about Martian climate and how it has varied in the past.”