MarsNews.com
December 11th, 2000

Europe To Have Major Sample Return Role Aviation Week & Space Technology

France, Italy and several other European countries are angling to play an important part in the sample return missions, and the demonstration flight that will precede them, in line with their growing participation in Martian exploration. Under a statement of intent (SOI) signed in October, French national space agency CNES will provide two orbital vehicles–one for a demonstration mission in 2007, the other for the first Mars Sample Return (MSR) flight; a network of four Netlander probes to accompany the 2007 mission; and the launch for the 2007 mission ( AW&ST Nov. 13, p. 99). The Netlanders will also involve the collaboration of German aerospace center DLR, the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and SSTC of Belgium. A final memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to be concluded late next year.

December 11th, 2000

NASA Weighs Mission Options Aviation Week & Space Technology

NASA has put all of its Mars sample return (MSR) mission options back on the table and plans to conduct an extensive engineering analysis over the next 1.5 years to select the best combination of new technology and operational techniques. The space agency’s goal is to make those decisions in time for a validation mission during the 2007 launch opportunity. And if all works according to plan, the systems and operations used during the 2007 mission would be mirrored in a sample return mission expectedas early as 2011.

December 11th, 2000

Mission Surge Goal: Decode Mars’ Mysteries Aviation Week & Space Technology

With all options back on the table, international teams are exploring new technology, advanced radioisotope power sources and Russian participation.

December 11th, 2000

Nozomi On Target for Mars Aviation Week & Space Technology

Japan’s Nozomi spacecraft is on schedule to enter an orbit in Mars’ upper atmosphere in January 2004 after completing the second of three trips it will take around the Sun since its July 1998 launch. The 1,177-lb. spacecraft has been taking measurements of the interplanetary medium as it continues on a four-year trip to Mars. These include counts of dust and energetic particles and readings of low energy plasma, the magnetic field and the densities of hydrogen and helium. Program Manager Koichiro Tsuruda of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences reports the spacecraft and its instruments are healthy.

December 11th, 2000

MGS Pries Secrets Out of Red Planet Aviation Week & Space Technology

Last week’s revelation from Mars Global Surveyor data–that sedimentary rocks suggest past bodies of water on the red planet–is just the latest discovery by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory spacecraft.

December 11th, 2000

Red Team Preps Odyssey to Mars Aviation Week & Space Technology

With a Red Team acting as an over-the-shoulder review panel, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. say they are on target for an Apr. 7 launch of the space agency’s next mission to the red planet. The mission is the 2001 Mars Odyssey, which is to spend two years mapping the planet’s surface and measuring its environment with an eye on understanding the basics of what it will take for man to visit, and perhaps live, on the planet. The 2001 Odyssey will operate from a 400-km.- (250-mi.) high-Sun-synchronous orbit. Launch from Cape Canaveral will be on a Delta II.