MarsNews.com
December 11th, 2000

Mission Surge Goal: Decode Mars’ Mysteries Aviation Week & Space Technology

With all options back on the table, international teams are exploring new technology, advanced radioisotope power sources and Russian participation.

December 11th, 2000

Nozomi On Target for Mars Aviation Week & Space Technology

Japan’s Nozomi spacecraft is on schedule to enter an orbit in Mars’ upper atmosphere in January 2004 after completing the second of three trips it will take around the Sun since its July 1998 launch. The 1,177-lb. spacecraft has been taking measurements of the interplanetary medium as it continues on a four-year trip to Mars. These include counts of dust and energetic particles and readings of low energy plasma, the magnetic field and the densities of hydrogen and helium. Program Manager Koichiro Tsuruda of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences reports the spacecraft and its instruments are healthy.

December 11th, 2000

MGS Pries Secrets Out of Red Planet Aviation Week & Space Technology

Last week’s revelation from Mars Global Surveyor data–that sedimentary rocks suggest past bodies of water on the red planet–is just the latest discovery by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory spacecraft.

December 11th, 2000

Red Team Preps Odyssey to Mars Aviation Week & Space Technology

With a Red Team acting as an over-the-shoulder review panel, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. say they are on target for an Apr. 7 launch of the space agency’s next mission to the red planet. The mission is the 2001 Mars Odyssey, which is to spend two years mapping the planet’s surface and measuring its environment with an eye on understanding the basics of what it will take for man to visit, and perhaps live, on the planet. The 2001 Odyssey will operate from a 400-km.- (250-mi.) high-Sun-synchronous orbit. Launch from Cape Canaveral will be on a Delta II.

December 11th, 2000

Beagle 2: New Benchmark For Mars Science, Engineering Aviation Week & Space Technology

Of all the innovative science and technology engineered into Europe’s Mars Express mission, perhaps none is so bold as the lander. Christened Beagle 2, after Charles Darwin’s legendary vessel, the lander will be pioneering in more ways than one. If successful, it will mark the first time countries other than the U.S. or the Soviet Union have landed a spacecraft on another planet. And assuming NASA’s two Athena probes touch down safely, it will be the first time three landers have reached such a body at the same time.

December 11th, 2000

Europe Targets 2003 Mars Touchdown Aviation Week & Space Technology

A mission underway at the European Space Agency will mark Europe’s entry into the Mars exploration effort while pushing the boundaries of Martian science and technology to new limits. Mars Express is intended to conduct the most thorough search yet for the presence of water or other signs of life on the red planet, despite a budget that would make NASA planners blush. Mars Express will comprise an orbiter costing 150 million euros ($127 million) and a lander, Beagle 2, that will cost barely 50 million euros–by far the cheapest Mars project ever. The probe will be ESA’s first Flexible mission–the agency’s answer to NASA’s “faster, better, cheaper” approach.