MarsNews.com
December 7th, 2016

Mars One presents an updated mission roadmap

Bas Lansdorp, Co-Founder & Chief Executive Officer : “Mars One can only implement the mission to Mars if we can afford it – and we need investments to get going. Being listed on a stock exchange will make fundraising more straightforward. In order to make Mars One’s commercial activities an attractive investment with the potential of a good return on investment, Mars One had to adjust the timing of the planned unmanned and manned missions. This pushes the large expenses associated with the mission hardware back in time, making the company cash positive sooner. The delay we are currently announcing is also because it took us longer to get to this point than we originally anticipated. Of course the whole Mars One team would have preferred to be able to stick to the original schedule, but this new timeline significantly improves our odds of successfully achieving this mission roadmap”.

Mars One is currently raising up to €10 million in the first round of funding after the listing on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. This will provide enough funding to move the mission to Mars forward: award new contracts to suppliers, organize the next round in the astronaut selection process, hire team members with experience in implementing Mars missions, and crew selection and training. Additionally, Mars One Ventures, the commercial arm of Mars One, will build a core team of experienced media professionals to develop the Mars One brand, including by creating captivating media content for audiences around the world.

December 6th, 2016

Rhode Island School of Design works with NASA on Mars suit

When scientists are trying to figure out how to live in near-isolation in a dome to simulate a Mars mission, the last thing they’ll need is an ill-fitting space suit. So one of the nation’s top design schools has come to the rescue.

Staff members and students at the Rhode Island School of Design have come up with a new, adjustable suit that closely resembles an actual space suit.

Real space suits are designed to work in zero gravity, meaning they’re too expensive and too heavy to use at the NASA-funded Mars simulation mission in Hawaii. The simulated space suits that are used instead wear out quickly and aren’t all that comfortable. They’re small and provide poor ventilation.

The new suit, unveiled Monday in Providence, is expected to be tested during the next Mars simulation mission in 2017 in Hawaii.

A yearlong Mars simulation mission ended in August. It was the fourth HI-SEAS, or Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation. NASA funded the study, run through the University of Hawaii.

November 21st, 2016

How bad is the radiation on Mars?

Diagram showing the amount of cosmic radiation the surface of Mars is exposed to. Credit: NASA

Diagram showing the amount of cosmic radiation the surface of Mars is exposed to. Credit: NASA

Mars has no protective magnetosphere, as Earth does. Scientists believe that at one time, Mars also experienced convection currents in its core, creating a dynamo effect that powered a planetary magnetic field. However, roughly 4.2 billions year ago – either due to a massive impact from a large object, or rapid cooling in its core – this dynamo effect ceased.

As a result, over the course of the next 500 million years, Mars atmosphere was slowly stripped away by solar wind. Between the loss of its magnetic field and its atmosphere, the surface of Mars is exposed to much higher levels of radiation than Earth. And in addition to regular exposure to cosmic rays and solar wind, it receives occasional lethal blasts that occur with strong solar flares.

November 10th, 2016

Is This What Living on Mars Will Look Like?

Mars has long been a source of fascination for everyone from scientists to filmmakers, but the Red Planet is no longer the mysterious world it once was. With NASA’s Curiosity Rover exploring the planet and Elon Musk’s Space X dedicated to planetary colonization, the dream of humans living on Mars may soon be more than a sci-fi plot line. But for now, it’s still up to the magic of Hollywood to give us a preview. National Geographic takes on this new frontier with Mars, a new six-part series that blends interviews with real-life astronauts and scientists from NASA and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the fictional story of a Mars landing in 2033. Developed with Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, the show, which debuts November 14 at 9pm ET on the National Geographic Channel, follows the international crew of the Daedalus as they attempt to land on Mars in a reusable rocket and built habitats.

Production designer Sophie Becher was tasked with creating an array of locations, from the headquarters of International Mars Science Foundation to the interior of the Daedalus to the habitat on Mars. Becher approached the projects from the characters point of view, especially when designing the extraterrestrial environments. “I become the astronaut,” she says. “What would I need to function? What sort of prop would help me keep my sanity?”

November 9th, 2016

Where Will President-Elect Trump Take American Space Endeavours?

Given the fiscal policies of his party, and his own stances on Climate Change, there is concern about how a Trump administration will affect NASA. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Gage Skidmore

Given the fiscal policies of his party, and his own stances on Climate Change, there is concern about how a Trump administration will affect NASA. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Gage Skidmore

With the 2016 election now finished and Donald Trump confirmed as the president-elect of the United States, there are naturally some concerns about what this could means for the future of NASA. Given the administration’s commitment to Earth science, and its plans for crewed missions to near-Earth Orbit and Mars, there is understandably some worry that the budget environment might be changing soon.

At this juncture, it is not quite clear how a Trump presidency will affect NASA’s mandate for space exploration and scientific research. But between statements made by the president-elect in the past, and his stances on issues like climate change, it seems clear that funding for certain types of research could be threatened. But there is also reason to believe that larger exploration programs might be unaffected.

November 7th, 2016

Mars One Going Public at Frankfurt Stock Exchange

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Mars One and InFin Innovative Finance AG [FRA:KCC] (“InFin”) are pleased to announce that a takeover agreement was signed between InFin and all shareholders of Mars One Ventures PLC (“Mars One Ventures”). InFin will acquire 100% of the shares of Mars One Ventures for €87 million with newly issued, fully paid up InFin shares. After admission of the new InFin shares to trading on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, the Mars One Ventures shareholders will hold 97.5% of the InFin shares. The boards of the companies have unanimously approved the agreement. InFin Innovative Finance AG will be renamed Mars One Ventures AG.

“Mars One is very pleased to have been acquired by InFin. This step provides the opportunity to raise capital through the listing on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. This listing also supports our aim to attract international support to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars: our global followers will have the opportunity to be part of this adventure and to literally own a piece of this historic venture. We have a solid business based on our historical performance that might be of interest to anyone looking for diversification of their investment portfolio,” says Bas Lansdorp, CEO and co-founder of Mars One.

With the acquisition of Mars One Ventures by InFin, Mars One creates a decisive and time-critical competitive advantage by being the first Mars exploration company to successfully go public. The listing at the renowned Frankfurt Stock exchange enables direct access to the global capital market. This will be the first global opportunity for investment banks, funds, stockbrokers and any other (retail) investor to take part in a human mission to another planet through buying shares in a listed company.

November 4th, 2016

A Dress Rehearsal For Life on Mars

In the Utah desert, scientists live and work at the Mars Desert Research Station. The terrain’s ferrous-red hue and the harshness of the climate are supposed mimic Mars’s. Each crew carries out experiments ranging from astrobiology and meteorite analysis to 3D-printing and social psychology.

November 1st, 2016

How NASA astronauts vote from space

For the first time ever, DNA was sequenced in space as part of the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation on the International Space Station. The sequencing device used is called MinION, and sequencing was performed by ISS astronaut Kathleen (Kate) Rubins.

For the first time ever, DNA was sequenced in space as part of the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation on the International Space Station. The sequencing device used is called MinION, and sequencing was performed by ISS astronaut Kathleen (Kate) Rubins.

In the future, voting from space could become somewhat more complicated.

At the moment, NASA only flies people to the Space Station located about 220 miles above the planet, but in the future, the agency wants to send humans to explore Mars, a trip that would require them to be off-world for at least a few years.

The space agency doesn’t have any specific rules governing how red planet-bound explorers will vote as of yet, but it might happen in much the same way as it does now.

“I don’t think anyone is making specific plans for voting from Mars yet, but I suspect it would work much the same,” NASA spokeswoman Brandi Dean told Mashable via email. “There is a delay in getting communications back and forth, but it’s on the order of minutes, so the current process would still work fine.”

October 11th, 2016

Barack Obama: America will take the giant leap to Mars CNN

obamaWe have set a clear goal vital to the next chapter of America’s story in space: sending humans to Mars by the 2030s and returning them safely to Earth, with the ultimate ambition to one day remain there for an extended time. Getting to Mars will require continued cooperation between government and private innovators, and we’re already well on our way.

The next step is to reach beyond the bounds of Earth’s orbit. I’m excited to announce that we are working with our commercial partners to build new habitats that can sustain and transport astronauts on long-duration missions in deep space. These missions will teach us how humans can live far from Earth — something we’ll need for the long journey to Mars.

October 6th, 2016

T-Mobile CEO Says He’ll Send Someone to Mars If He Gets 1 Million Retweets CNBC

T-Mobile CEO John Legere wants to send someone to Mars.

Legere on Wednesday offered on Twitter a trip to Mars for one lucky individual, provided that the offer gets more than one million retweets by 11:59 p.m. PT on Oct. 11.

A T-Mobile spokeswoman said “When he [John Legere] hit 3 million – and Elon Musk basically said Mars travel is coming from SpaceX in just a few years for just $200k a person – John thought: “Let’s send someone to Mars!”