MarsNews.com
January 29th, 2013

Where a river once flowed on Mars SEN

The European Space Agency’s Mars Express orbiter has captured images of a deep channel carved into the Martian landscape which is believed to have been created by a river in the distant past.
Named Reull Vallis, the river-like channel stretches 1,500 kilometres and is almost 7 kilometres wide in places, and 300 metres deep. The valley is flanked by many tributaries, one of which can be seen on the main image. The orbiter’s High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) was used to take the pictures.
Along the floor of the valley are grooves that run parallel to its sides, and scientists believe these were scratched into the floor by the movement of debris and ice long after running water had carved out the valley. The scars are therefore evidence of glacial movement along the valley.

March 25th, 2010

NIKON WORLD ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Progress Report from Mars Nikon World Winter 2010

Nikon’s long-standing commitment to the scientific community ranges from our involvement in NASA’s exploration of space to our support of individual photographer’s documentation of our planet. Particularly satisfying is our work with scientists and researchers who use photography to simultaneously explore the past and reach for the future.
Dale Andersen is a principal investigator at the SETI Institute’s Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe. That’s SETI, as in Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence. So why does Dale take part in research and exploration missions to the Arctic and Antarctica?

September 16th, 2009

Russia delays Mars probe launch until 2011: report MarsDaily

Russia will pushed back its flagship satellite mission to Mars’ moon until 2011 in a move which will delay the joint launch of China’s first Mars probe, space sources were cited as saying Wednesday.

March 18th, 2009

Mars Researchers Take an Arctic Road Trip Popular Mechanics

Mars researchers plan to take a Humvee for a 1200-mile off-road trip on thinning sea ice in the Arctic. Their pursuit? To answer questions about bacterial contamination, to help design a rover for Martian travel and to experience extreme isolation firsthand.

May 1st, 2006

Prototype Mars Space Suit Goes to Badlands AP

Students and faculty from five North Dakota colleges will unveil a prototype Mars spacesuit this weekend in the Badlands. Students from the University of North Dakota, North Dakota State, Dickinson State, the state College of Science in Wahpeton and Turtle Mountain Community College in Belcourt designed the experimental suit with a $100,000 NASA grant.

December 6th, 2005

Deep down, Mars harbors a lot of ice Frozen water may even be drinkable, scientists say San Francisco Chronicle

Century-old fancies of a past Mars covered with warm, sparkling seas are fading, as scientists realize the planet’s rust-red surface has probably been a dry, frigid icebox for almost all of its history. That doesn’t necessarily mean that Martian microbes aren’t thriving at this very moment in volcanically heated subterranean swimming pools thousands of feet beneath the surface — the scientific jury is still out on that popular hypothesis. But whenever liquid water squirted to the surface during the past 3.5 billion years, it usually sloshed around for only brief periods before freezing or vaporizing in the drier-than-Sahara wasteland, judging by scientific evidence reported Monday at the annual San Francisco meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

May 13th, 2005

Personal Nuclear Power: New Battery Lasts 12 Years LiveScience

A new type of battery based on the radioactive decay of nuclear material is 10 times more powerful than similar prototypes and should last a decade or more without a charge, scientists announced this week. The longevity would make the battery ideal for use in pacemakers or other surgically implanted devices, developers say, or it might power spacecraft or deep-sea probes. You might also find these nuclear batteries running sensors and other small devices in your home in a few years. Such devices “don’t consume much power,” said University of Rochester electrical engineer Philippe Fauchet.

January 8th, 2004

Effort to Clear Path of Mars Rover Fails LiveScience

NASA’s efforts to clear the way for the Spirit rover to reach Mars’ surface have so far failed, and engineers are considering alternative routes for maneuvering the six-wheeled robot off its lander, scientists said Thursday morning. NASA planned to try one more time to gather up the deflated air bags that cradled Spirit during landing but now blocks the ramp engineers want to use as the rover’s exit to the Martian soil. “We were not successful in doing that yesterday,” said Matt Wallace, mission manager for Spirit’s sixth day of operations.