October 7th, 2015

Las Vegas bets that SpaceX will make it to Mars before NASA


NASA may believe that it’ll be the first to land humans on Mars, but don’t tell that to Las Vegas betting houses. Popular Mechanics has asked Docsports’ Raphael Esparza to set odds for the first organization to put people on Mars, and he believes that SpaceX stands a much better chance of reaching the Red Planet (5 to 1) than anyone else, including NASA (80 to 1). To put it bluntly, SpaceX has the money and the motivation that others don’t — NASA would be the favorite, but its budget cuts are holding it back.

August 21st, 2015

Two MIT students just schooled a company trying to send people to Mars

Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

Two MIT engineering students just faced off with a private company that wants to send people on a one-way trip to Mars — and one group won by a landslide.
The debate stemmed from the students’ scathing critique of Mars One’s plan to set up a permanent human colony on Mars. That report, published in 2014, triggered widespread criticism of the company’s too-low $6-billion budget, unrealistic timeline, and general lack of preparedness for the challenges of Mars.

On Aug. 13 at the Mars Society Conference, two of the MIT students picked apart Mars One’s plan again — this time in front of CEO Bas Lansdorp and Barry Finger, chief engineer and director of life support systems for Paragon Space Development Corporation.

July 17th, 2015

Mars One presents more details on next astronaut selection rounds

Mars One is pleased to provide further insight into the upcoming selection rounds that The Mars100 will face. The new information on the Mars One astronaut selection process has been released in a new Inside 360 article: “Screening from 100 to 24”. Mars One additionally introduces six new candidates to the astronaut selection process that have replaced former candidates that were not able to proceed to the next selection round.

In the latest Inside 360 article, Dr. Norbert Kraft, Chief Medical Officer of Mars One, outlines Round Three and Four of Mars One’s astronaut selection process. Round Three takes place over the course of 5 days, in which groups of 10 to 15 candidates are formed. “The Mars One selection committee will then set up group dynamic challenges and provide study materials related to the challenges,” explains Dr. Kraft. “This allows us to observe how the candidates work in a group setting.”

Following the challenges, the Mars100 will be screened to 40 candidates that will enter the next selection phase: isolation. Candidates will spend nine days in an isolation unit. “It is very important that the candidates are observed closely to examine how they act in situations of prolonged close contact with one another,” says Dr. Kraft. “During the journey to Mars and upon arrival, they will spend 24 hours a day with each other. It is during this time that the simplest things may start to become bothersome. It takes a specific team dynamic to be able to handle this and it is our job to find those that are best suited for this challenge.”

June 2nd, 2015

Can Mars One colonise the red planet? The Guardian

When NASA’s first rover set down on the surface of Mars in 1997, its streamed colour images caused an early internet sensation. After centuries of dreaming, here we were, at eye level to our closest potentially habitable neighbour, and the sight was as bleakly majestic as we could have imagined: a rocky, red desertscape on a scale entirely alien to Earth. One mountain, Olympus Mons, was the largest in our solar system (three times the height of Everest, with a footprint the size of Sweden); dune-seas swept its northern hemisphere while 7km-deep canyons veined the south.

Watching on a clunky desktop computer in the Dutch university town of Twente, 20-year-old Bas Lansdorp’s first thought was one of wonder; his second of longing (“I want to go there!”), then the melancholy realisation that, being Dutch, he could never fly with NASA. So he’d have to do it himself.

March 19th, 2015

Mars One Colony Project Delays Manned Red Planet Mission to 2026

The private colonization project Mars One has pushed its planned launch of the first humans toward the Red Planet back by two years, to 2026. The delay was necessitated by a lack of investment funding, which has slowed work on a robotic precursor mission that Mars One had wanted to send toward the Red Planet in 2018, Mars One CEO Bas Lansdorp said in a new video posted today (March 19).

February 23rd, 2015

Punjabi girl shortlisted for ‘Mars One’ mission The Tribune

Dubai-based Indian girl Ritika Singh (29) has made it to top 100 under the much-hyped “Mars One” mission launched by a Netherlands-based NGO last year to start human civilization on the Red Planet by 2024.
Her family resides in Jalandhar. Her father Narinder Singh is the Deputy Director General, Jalandhar Doordarshan. The adrenaline junkie has been chosen along with other two Indians from among two lakh applicants who participated in the online contest from across the world.

February 17th, 2015

Bellevue man among final candidates for mission to colonize Mars KIRO 7 Eyewitness News

Carl LeCompte spends his days now on the Microsoft campus in Bellevue, but he hopes to live out the rest of his life on Mars.
LeCompte just learned he made the cut of 100 for the Mars One project out of Denmark. Mars One plans to send 24 people to build a colony on Mars — with the first crew of four arriving in 2025.
LeCompte is a single, 28-year-old computer programmer who became enamored with life on another planet when he read “Dune” as a second grader.
He was one of 200,000 initial applicants in 2013.
Since then he’s been through a series of applications, online interviews, and even had to get a doctor’s write-off.

February 12th, 2015

One Way to Mars The Washington Post

Mars One envisions a colony of humans on the red planet, starting in 2025. Plenty of people think that is unrealistic, but the nonprofit is vigorously recruiting potential pioneers to go to mars, one-way, with no hope of coming back. Here’s the ambitious — some say too ambitious — timeline: February 13, 2015: About 50 men and 50 women learn they’ve made it to Round 3. Group challenges will test survival skills and math ability, but they’ll also reveal how candidates deal with adversity — and with each other.

February 9th, 2015

Short film tells the stories of three people who want to die on Mars Mashable

It takes a certain type of person to willfully leave behind life on Earth forever in hopes of colonizing a new planet.
Filmmaker Peter Savodnik and his short-form documentary company Stateless Media set out to explore such a mindset by telling the stories of three of the 660 people vying for a one-way trip to the Red Planet as part of a worldwide competition called Mars One. Putting technical and scientific considerations aside, the 10-minute film, If I Die on Mars, delves into the lives of three far-flung candidates. It focuses not just on their intense enthusiasm for the prospect of exploring Mars, but also the sense of longing and frustration that fuels their urge to escape their own planet.
“We’re alternately fascinated and a little bit troubled by the idea of people wanting to go away forever,” Savodnik told Mashable. “I think it’s fair to say that everyone involved felt like we learned a great deal about these people and how they think.”

February 5th, 2015

Maggie Lieu Wants To Be First Woman To Give Birth On Mars The Huffington Post

Humans have yet to set foot on Mars, but one British woman already wants to be the first to give birth on the red planet.
Maggie Lieu, 24, is an astrophysics Ph. D. candidate at Birmingham University. She is also one of 600 people being considered for the Mars One project, which hopes to set up a permanent colony on Mars by 2025.
Lieu will find out next month if she will join 39 other people who will actually train for the one-way trip to the red planet.
If Lieu makes it to Mars, she plans to get busy colonizing the planet.